Recursion — .999…

Recursion —
.333… / Noise Variation(s)


“Consider the beautiful repetition of tiles on a roof, waves in the ocean, cells in the body, the scales of a fish, the blades of grass, the bricks in a wall, the hair on a head… The repetition, by itself, already begins to create a satisfying harmony. Somehow the sense of order in a thing comes from the fact that elements are repeated over and over and over again.” — Alexander, Christopher. The Nature of Order: An Essay on the Art of Building and the Nature of the Universe.


 

installation: sound, video, and sculpture
in collaboration with John Dombrowski
Fine Arts Gallery, Virginia Commonwealth University, 2012


 

.333…

Nine curves, suspended — a form as an aggregate of repeated gestures.
(nine curved wood panels: 12 x 96 / 24 x 96 / 36 x 96 inches, digital video projection (single-channel)

Experiential time is considered as an aggregate of repeated gestures as object, image, and sound. Movement and the passage of time is created using materials and processes, analogue in combination with digital. I have come to understand that in the presence of time, matter is a result of a recurring process and is always unique from one moment to the next. The inquiry into singularity, as a repetitive pattern, part of a larger complex system, is about forms limitlessly in the process of becoming, in constant states of flux, never complete, and existing amidst the ever changing collective whole.


 

Noise Variation(s) — John Dombroski

 

Nine speakers suspended just above ear level, nine field recordings.
Noise Variation(s) (2012 – )Nine speakers suspended just above ear level, nine field recordings.
(AM radio static, air flowing through HVAC ventilation, motorway traffic, skin on skin, human breath, human circulatory system, rain on tin roof, trees in wind, coastal ocean waves).

Nine speakers are suspended in a grid pattern in space. A different field recording of noise plays on each monitor. Text on a card at the entrance reveals a list of each recording’s content. The audience is invited to move throughout the space to discover which recording plays on which monitor, encouraging organic movement and meeting of people around the space.


“What we call “life” is a general condition which exists, to some degree or other, in every part of space: brick, stone, grass, river, painting, building, daffodil, human being, forest, city. And further: The key to this idea is that every part of space-every connected region of space, small or large-has some degree of life, and that this degree of life is well defined, objectively existing, and measurable.” Alexander, Christopher. “Degrees of Life.” The Nature of Order: An Essay on the Art of Building and the Nature of the Universe.